Memorizing Music

Using Learning Tracks

 

USING LEARNING TRACK EFFICIENTLY

Commonly barbershoppers use “Learning Tracks” on a CD or Cassette.  However, people frequently do not use Learning Tracks very effectively.  There is a common tendency to sing along with the tracks rather than LISTENING to the tracks clearly.  Everyone likes to sing and when they do, they always hear themselves more clearly than the tracks.  But the important thing is not to sing, but to get it in your head.  It’s what goes on in your mind that’s the important part.  Think things like, “We’re at the bridge now”, or “ Oh, this time it goes up” or ”This time it’s only a half step”. etc.  These thoughts will help you more than just singing it thru.  So Listen & Think


MUSCLE LEARNING

Of course you will want to sing along with the tracks but it should not be mindless repetition.  About the only thing that pure repetition does is eventually to develop what is called “Muscle Learning”.  Muscle learning means that when we actually do something (like singing), over an extensive period of repetitions, our muscles learn what they have been doing so it’s easier to do it the next time.  Thus, it is important to practice accurately.  We will talk more of this on a few pages on, about the “Practice Game”. 


LIMITATIONS OF USING LEARNING TRACKS

One of the main problems with learning tracks is that for an up-tunes, they often go too fast.  It’s easy to accept little half step inaccuracies for instance.  So keep checking the learning tracks with the printed score.  Sometimes there are even inaccuracies or intentional variations in the recording so that may confuse the issue.


PRACTICE SHOULD BE PERFECT

Understand that “Practice doesn’t makes Perfect”.  Rather “Practice Should Be Perfect”.  When we make mistakes we are developing the habit of doing it incorrectly.  Thus again, the reason why we need to LISTEN to the tracks rather than putting the emphasis on singing with the tracks at first.  We need to have a clear picture of what we are trying to do before we do it too much.


                                    I would love to hear from you. 

                          I appreciate any comments or suggestions.

                                    tednorton@roadrunner.com